Vitae London x Korlekie

As pioneers of slow fashion, we at Korlekie have been working hard with selected social brands to bring you well made fashion with a heart. This season we have partnered with Vitae London to bring you this luxury choker & watch gift set. Vitae London is a watch brand working with charities in South Africa where…

Kente: Nubuke Foundation

Working with Nubuke Foundation, Ghana in cultivating the visual art and culture of Ghana through traditional heritage textile techniques such as kente weaving.Kente is one of the traditional fabrics of Ghana, weaved by artisans who have specially schooled in the art of the heritage weave made on large manual looms. We sought to bring this…

Needle Lace: Mia Dvorak

Experimental work with needle lace, a very old craft technique that only few know and have the time to work and produce great products with.Utilising some of our 3D scanned research of faces and bodies, we invited Mia Dvorak, a needle lace craftswomen from Northern Italy, to create some intricate samples of needle lace for…

Cross Stitching: Sian Williams

In our passion for craft and exploration of diverse techniques, we decided it’d be interesting to re-create the idea of cross-stitch into an actual piece of wearable clothing.Commissioning a cross-stitch enthusiast from Wales, UK, we were able to navigate our expectations through sketches and samples.The result, at least over 150hrs later, were 2 exquisite pieces…

AHA Bolivia

Our collaboration with Aha Bolivia in recreating our digitised UV mapping designs via digital communication was a challenging and interesting experience that produced stunning results. Being pioneers of craftsmanship we sought to mix the old with the new, traditional manual techniques with digital tools, to create uniquely modern, ethical and fair-trade products.

The step by the step design process and daily exchanges opened potential new doors for collaborations over digital mediums but also highlighted limitations that through face to face communication could have been solved easily, but the difficulty and imperfections of a seamless exchange and culture barrier are what made the final pieces so unpredictable and interesting. Sometimes being definitive (standard in design) creates a lack of character, particularly true in fashion.
Final pieces were produced in Bolivia using fair-trade wools and cotton farmed ethically and manufactured by a hub of local fair paid crafters.

For more on Aha Bolivia visit their website here: http://www.ahabolivia.com